Entry Type: Place - Starting with K

Kirkpatrick Cemetery (Saline County)

The tiny Kirkpatrick Cemetery in Bryant (Saline County) is located on the Old Stagecoach Road (Arkansas State Highway 5). It is the burial ground for the family of Saline County pioneers Paisley Kirkpatrick and Elizabeth Allen Kirkpatrick Medlock. The oldest marked burials, those of Hannah E. Kirkpatrick Thompson and Elizabeth C. Kirkpatrick, date back to July 1860. In 2002, the cemetery was rediscovered by local resident Ben Holder during the construction of a commercial building nearby. He built a brick wall around the southern and western sides to help protect it from development. The Bryant Historical Society added an iron fence and large plaque noting its establishment in 1850. Although the original markers in Kirkpatrick Cemetery have been damaged over …

Knobel (Clay County)

Knobel is a city in Clay County, about seven miles south of Corning (Clay County). Once a stop on the Iron Mountain Railroad, Knobel remains a minor agricultural center for the surrounding region. Frequently flooded by the Mississippi River and shaken by the New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811–1812, northeastern Arkansas remained sparsely settled until after the Civil War. The region consisted largely of swampland and hardwood forests, and no one lived permanently in the place that would become Knobel until after the Civil War. Many people passed through the area, however, since the site was on the road that connected Chalk Bluff (Clay County) on the St. Francis River to Pocahontas (Randolph County). In 1866, J. H. Allen began farming …

Knoxville (Johnson County)

Knoxville is a city in southeastern Johnson County, close to Lake Dardanelle. Originally developed as a railroad town, Knoxville is crossed by both U.S. Highway 64 and Interstate 40. The Arkansas River Valley has long been inhabited, as can be seen by rock art that still exists in Johnson County. The Osage claimed the area as hunting territory at the time of the Louisiana Purchase, and a treaty later gave the land to the Cherokee for a few years, until a subsequent treaty moved them farther west. The first white man to own the land on which Knoxville would be established was Thomas May, who has been described as Arkansas’s first millionaire. May owned nearly 800 acres of bottomland in Johnson …